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What is Human Papillomavirus - a.k.a. HPV?

Author: Dr. William Rappaport
Date: September 2017

little girl getting vaccination from pediatrician at office

What is HPV?

HPV is virus that enters the body by through intimate contact via tiny small tears or abrasions. It usually comes from sexual contact and most people will become infected with it at some point in their life. There are over 100 strains of the HPV virus. The ones that we are most concerned with are those that cause genital warts and cancer in both boys and girls. This type of HPV infection can lead to deadly forms of cancers; vaginal, vulvar, cervical, anal, penile and throat. Luckily, we can prevent the virus from ever entering our system with the new HPV vaccine.

Should I Vaccinate my Child? Yes!

The HPV vaccine is crucial for your child regardless of gender. According to the CDC, about 14 million people including teens are infected with the virus each year. The vaccine can protect girls from cervical, vaginal and vulva cancers and in boys’ penile cancer. Mouth and throat cancers in both can be caused by HPV and prevented with the vaccine.

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Pros & Cons of Kids Smart Phone Use

Author: Dr. William Rappaport
Date: August 2017

Child on mobile phone

Teaching responsible use is the key

Every parent in the 21st century must ask the question, “When is it ok for my child to have a cell phone”? It equates to parents in the 20th century asking, “When is it ok to let a child watch television”? The answer is when your son or daughter can use these devices responsibly. Lets’ face it, we live in a mobile and global society. Responsible use of electronics is the key to allowing our children the inevitability of owning a cell phone. 

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Headaches

Author: Dr. William Rappaport
Date: July 2017

Headaches

Not all Headaches are the same

We all get headaches. Kids, teens, adults, seniors and even babies. Headaches can be brought on by factors such as stress, food, the environment, infection, or even the need for eye glasses. Headaches fall into different categories with the most common being tension, migraines, cluster, and sinus. Knowing the symptoms can help your doctor determine the type of headache you or your child is suffering from and how to treat. 

Tension Headaches come and go throughout the day. Episodic tension headaches can be the most common among kids and teens causing mild to moderate pain. They come and go when the child is under a great deal of stress or suffers from an anxiety. The pain usually begins gradually and occurs in the middle of the day then subsides. Chronic tension headaches can last all day. The pain intensity comes and goes but is constant. They occur more than 10-15 times a month. Tension headaches whether chronic or episodic have symptoms such as irritability, mild sensitivity to noise and light, poor concentration, and often are felt upon waking. Most tension headaches are often described as pressure or pain around the forehead. 
 

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Bed Wetting

Author: Dr. William Rappaport
Date: May 2017

bed wetting

Bed Wetting: What is it? What can be done to help the child? 

Families who have children older than five who wet their bed or eliminate during the day are often concerned something is seriously wrong with their child. In fact the opposite is true. Love, compassion, behavior modification and psychotherapy can do wonders for a child who suffers this humiliating disturbance in life.

To make a diagnosis of enuresis, bed wetting, a child must have reached the chronological or developmental age of five. It must take place at least twice a week for three months or cause significant distress and interfere with the child's school and/or social life.

There are two main types of enuresis in children. Primary enuresis occurs when a child has never established bladder control. Secondary enuresis occurs when a person has established bladder control for a period of six months, then relapses and begins wetting. Involuntary enuresis is much more common than voluntary enuresis.

Primary enuresis occurs when young children lack bladder control from infancy. Most of these children have urine control problems only during sleep. It is unconscious and non-intentional. These children do not wake up in time to relieve themselves. In other cases, the child's enuresis may be related to a sleep disorder.

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The Chargemaster and it's role in the healthcare system

Author: Dr. William Rappaport
Date: April 2017

medical costs with stethoscope

In the past couple of weeks we have seen much debate regarding the health care system. President Trump tried to reform Obama Care in what he termed  “Repeal and Replace”.  The bill ultimately did not pass because the president had no support in the house and senate.
 
This begs the question of where is the real problem? What can be done about the costs of rising healthcare in our country?
 
All the politicians have it wrong, Republicans and Democrats. It's not about who pays for healthcare; it's all about the pricing from supplies to procedures. This pricing is determined arbitrarily by the same facilities that are supposed to be loyal to saving a life. THE HOSPITALS!
 
Why should a pacemaker cost $56,000 in one hospital and $23,000 in another? Why should a box of gauze be charged at $77 when you can buy a box for a dollar? Until we rein in the hospitals, which represent 33% of a trillion dollar medical budget, we will never control costs and will never have an open and fair market.

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ADHD Symptoms & Myths

Author: Dr. William Rappaport
Date: March 2017

ADHD KidsAttention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a brain disorder.  It is marked by inattention, hyperactivity and impulsivity. A person can have one or all three characteristics simultaneously for a long period of time.  It is absolutely normal for children to show these behaviors from time to time. However, those with ADHD present in a more severe consistent way. It can interfere with how they function at school, in the playground, at home, and through their schoolwork. It presents through inattention, hyperactivity/impulsivity or a combination of all three.
 
Kids with symptoms of inattention only, often make careless mistakes and have problems sustaining attention in conversation, reading and during play. They do not listen when spoken to directly and have problems organizing tasks, schoolwork and personal belongings. These children often are seen as forgetful or disorganized when in reality they actually cannot help the behavior.

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